Department of Critical Care Medicine
School of Medicine Queen's University
 

Program Structure

The Critical Care Program is generally a two-year program divided into 26 four-week blocks. This includes thirteen blocks of general adult Critical Care, one block of Cardiac Echo training, one block of Toxicology and one block of Cardiac Surgery ICU. Ten blocks are available for electives and other recommended rotations, allowing residents to customize their training to suit their personal career goals. For some residents, Critical Care training may overlap with the final one or two years of base specialty training; for these trainees the program with generally span three years.



Example of Straight Entry (2 year program)

Blocks

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

First

ICU

ICU

ELEC

ELEC

ICU

ICU

CSU

ELEC

ELEC

ICU-LHO

ELEC

ICU

ICU

Second

ECHO

TOX

ICU

ICU

ICU-LHO

ICU

ELEC

ELEC

ELEC

ELEC

ELEC

ICU

ICU

 

 

Program Year

 

Example of Overlapped Training with Base Specialty (3 year program)

Blocks

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

First

ELEC

ELEC

ICU- LHO

CSU

ELEC

ELEC

ELEC

ICU

ICU

BASE

BASE

ICU

ICU

Second

BASE

BASE

ICU

ICU

BASE

BASE

BASE

BASE

BASE

BASE

BASE

BASE

BASE

Third

ICU

ICU

ICU

ECHO

TOX

ICU - LHO

ELEC

ELEC

ELEC

ELEC

ELEC

ICU

ICU

ICU:              Intensive Care Unit, Kingston General Hospital
ELEC:           Elective
CSU:             Cardiac Intensive Care, Kingston
ICU-LHO:     Community ICU, Lakeridge Health, Oshawa
BASE:           Rotations in base specialty
TOX:             Toxicology

 

Recently, Queen’s University has embarked on an innovative program to transition all training programs to a competency based curriculum by 2017. The competency-based curriculum is formalizing an approach of graded responsibility and focus on practical acquisition of skills and knowledge that has long been a tenant of our training program. We feel this philosophy will continue to be one of the true strengths of the program as residents continue to achieve a high level of comfort in independent patient care, while enjoying close, collegial relationships with the attending staff.

The curriculum is divided into four phases of training. The “Transition to Discipline” is a short, early introduction to the speciality focused on ensuring comfort with basic concepts, procedures and roles within the ICU. The “Foundations of Discipline” stage occurs in the first large block of rotations and is focused on the development of knowledge of physiology and key critical care concepts. During this stage, trainees supervise patient care by junior trainees with close supervision from attending staff. They assess all consults, admissions and discharges in close collaboration with attending staff.

During the “Core of Discipline” stage, trainees develop competence in advanced technical skills such as bronchoscopy and percutaneous tracheostomy insertion. They take a leadership role in daily team rounds, and participate in the teaching program for junior learners. Supervision by attending physicians gradually evolves into a coaching relationship during this phase.

The final stage is “Transition to Practice” during which residents take on all the roles of an attending physician, including resource allocation and management decision-making. They will supervise and lead patient care in the ICU with the supervising attending physician always available to provide coaching, consultation and discussion.